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www.nomanwalksalone.com

STAND UP STRAIGHT. NO, STRAIGHTER.

by David Isle

In my last post on clothes and the body, I discussed the dropped shoulder, a very common defect. I have bad news: this is by no means the only affliction that modern life has visited upon our poor human bodies. Some large fraction of Americans suffer from back pain, according to the American Chiropractic Association, which I assume to be completely disinterested and trustworthy on this important matter. Much of this suffering is the result of poor posture. But even more importantly, poor posture will make your clothes fit awkwardly.

You probably think that you can solve this problem by standing up straight. The surprising difficulty is that what you think is straight is probably not straight.

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WHAT MAKES A GOOD SPORTCOAT

by David Isle

With the decline in suit-wearing, the importance of the sport coat has risen in the milieu of male wearables. Finding the right one is a little bit like getting a dog – you can’t describe what you’re looking for, but eventually one barks at you and you know you’ve got your guy. But as a rough starting point, a good sport coat is one that: 1) doesn’t look like a suit jacket; 2) looks good with light blue button-down shirts.

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THE GREAT NAVY TROUSER DEBATE
by David Isle
Although worsted wool navy trousers are a common sight in American offices today, they are like the Windows 8 operating system that their wearers stare at all day: the vestigial result of a product adapted too far away from its original environment. They look too much like what they often are - suit pants whose owner simply left his jacket at home once the dress code changed to business casual. For this reason, it is difficult, although not impossible, to find images of men wearing odd navy trousers in the pages of Apparel Arts magazine, which even today remain a canonical reference for men interested in dressing well.

The orphaned suit pants problem is unfortunate, because there are many handsome sport coats that look best with navy trousers. While a dark sport coat with light pants – typically in some shade of gray or brown – is the easiest and most common combination, it would be a shame to give up on light-colored sport coats entirely. A man with such a sport coat who doesn’t want to leave his house in just his boxer shorts then has to consider wearing a darker color on his bottom half. Navy and dark gray are natural choices, but also the most common colors for suits, which brings us back to the problem described in the first paragraph.
The solution, to my mind, is to distinguish the trouser from its suit-bound cousin not by color, but by texture. This almost necessarily means using seasonal fabrics, as the more textured fabrics tend to be designed for more extreme temperatures - moleskin, corduroy, flannel, and tweed for cold weather; linen for warm. Cotton twill, in its various weights, can stretch across seasons. It’s not that you can’t make a suit out of any of these fabrics, but at least they aren’t identical to what’s used for the three-season wool suits that populate the suit rack at any department store.

Blue is a very versatile color - it’s no accident that blue jeans have become so popular for casual wear. But the blue jeans silhouette is too casual to wear with a sport coat. It requires a particularly casual sport coat, or a particularly natty dresser, to create a good-looking combination of jeans and jacket. Tailored trousers in a casual navy fabric are not so demanding, making them the solution to a problem that apparently has not occurred to most of the American workforce.

THE GREAT NAVY TROUSER DEBATE

by David Isle

Although worsted wool navy trousers are a common sight in American offices today, they are like the Windows 8 operating system that their wearers stare at all day: the vestigial result of a product adapted too far away from its original environment. They look too much like what they often are - suit pants whose owner simply left his jacket at home once the dress code changed to business casual. For this reason, it is difficult, although not impossible, to find images of men wearing odd navy trousers in the pages of Apparel Arts magazine, which even today remain a canonical reference for men interested in dressing well.

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Cool mention of No Man Walks Alone and our EoToTo polo today in the WSJ ‘Off Duty’.  The article is about terry-cloth polo as worn by Pablo Picasso in the late fifties 📰 (at Wall Street Journal)

Cool mention of No Man Walks Alone and our EoToTo polo today in the WSJ ‘Off Duty’. The article is about terry-cloth polo as worn by Pablo Picasso in the late fifties 📰 (at Wall Street Journal)

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AGAINST FLAIR
by David Isle
The rise of online made-to-measure tailors has made custom clothing available to many men who can’t stomach the prices charged by the bespoke houses of Savile Row and the Chiaia district of Naples.
Perhaps it’s inevitable that the excitement of infinite options lead to some poor choices, in particular those that “personalize” the garment and advertise its custom make. It’s human to want to show off a new toy. But a suit that is made for you should distinguish itself by a superior fit, not garish details that a ready-made retailer would have the good sense to avoid. Here are some of those most common missteps.
[[MORE]]
Contrasting buttonholes: Like many of these trends borne of customized styling, a contrasting buttonhole can be put on any ready-to-wear garment for just a few dollars. So it’s not even a very strong signal that the jacket has been custom made. More importantly, it looks terrible. The contrasting thread is like a buttonhole highlighter. Why do you want people looking at your buttonholes?



Working buttonholes worn open: Like contrasting threads, working buttonholes can be put on almost any ready-to-wear jacket. They also aren’t put on every bespoke jacket. The Duke of Windsor himself did not have working buttonholes on his jacket sleeves. But if you do have them, keep them closed. Open cuff buttons are like wearing a T-shirt that says, “Ask me about my custom-made jacket!”
Colorful lining: This one is fairly innocuous. The jacket lining is rarely seen, and there are respected bespoke makers, such as Rubinacci, that like to put exotic linings on their jackets. But I worry that anyone buying a jacket just for the lining will be unable to suppress an urge to display it. (“Oh, why am I holding my jacket open? Umm…just stretching. Yea, thanks, fuchsia is my favorite color.”)
Obnoxious Pick-stitching: Pick-stitching isn’t a bespoke feature, but is one that used to indicate a well-made jacket. It has no functional value*. It doesn’t hold anything on the jacket together. If it’s subtle, it adds a artisanal-looking detail that rewards the close observer.

But like many such details, once it was understood as a signal of quality, it was cheapened and exaggerated, just as the Bentley became the Chrysler 300.


If, stripped of these conspicuous details, these shouting Lilliputians, your suit seems just like a poorly made ready-to-wear suit that doesn’t even fit particularly well, the answer is not re-instate the flair. Focus instead on fit and silhouette. Good ready-to-wear flatters most men more than cheap made-to-measure. If you find the right cut and a good alterations tailor, you will have a suit that doesn’t need the distraction of colorful buttonholes.   
*Esteemed tailor Jeffery Diduch, author of the blog Tutto Fatto a Mano, corrects me that pick stitching does serve the purpose of keeping the edge of the lapel crisp and prevent it from rolling.

AGAINST FLAIR

by David Isle

The rise of online made-to-measure tailors has made custom clothing available to many men who can’t stomach the prices charged by the bespoke houses of Savile Row and the Chiaia district of Naples.

Perhaps it’s inevitable that the excitement of infinite options lead to some poor choices, in particular those that “personalize” the garment and advertise its custom make. It’s human to want to show off a new toy. But a suit that is made for you should distinguish itself by a superior fit, not garish details that a ready-made retailer would have the good sense to avoid. Here are some of those most common missteps.

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O, reason not the need! Our basest beggars
Are in the poorest thing superfluous.
Allow not nature more than nature needs,
Man’s life is cheap as beast’s. Thou art a lady:
If only to go warm were gorgeous,
Why, nature needs not what thou gorgeous wear’st
Which scarcely keeps thee warm.
- Shakespeare, King Lear
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HOW TO STORE YOUR EXPANDING WARDROBE
by S. Charlie Weyman
It’s embarrassing to admit, but I have more clothes than the average small-sized family, and over the years, I’ve had to come up with creative solutions for storage. Whether you’re a sane person who’s simply looking to de-clutter, or a clotheshorse looking for more space, here are ten ways to get more out of your closet. We’ll start with simple steps that can help everyone, and then descend into drastic measures for the truly depraved.
Go vertical. The key to smart storage is to maximize vertical space. Install a second rod by either attaching it to the wall or hanging it from your primary rod (there are kits for this). For a less comprehensive solution, consider hanging clothes organizers, which you can use to hold sweaters and shoes.

Store things under your bed. Canvas containers allow your clothes to breathe, but plastic ones are better if you have dust bunnies.
Make use of the closet door. An over-the-door shoe organizer can hold up to twelve pairs of shoes, which will free up the floor for briefcases and … umm … shoe racks for more shoes.
Utilize wall space. Build shelves up and down your walls, which can hold sweaters and shirts with the aid of vertical shelf dividers. Wall hooks can also be used to hang belts and yesterday’s jeans.
Store out-of-season clothes in the basement. Leave the prime real estate for things you’ll actually wear in the next six months.
Label boxes. Organize stacked shoeboxes by labeling them with Post-It Durable Tabs. You can also invest in clear shoeboxes with drawer-front pulls.
Get stackable shoe racks, especially ones that you can adjust to any width. Those will help maximize your shoe storage space, and get those boots off the floor.
Get matching hangers. OK, this won’t actually maximize your space, but it’ll help visually de-clutter.
Get another closet. At some point, there’s only so much you can do. Sell what you don’t wear anymore? That’s crazy talk. I say get a free standing closet, ideally one with two tiers of shelves and rods so you can maximize space.
Find outside seasonal storage. Some high-end dry cleaners offer free seasonal storage, where if you use their dry cleaning services, they’ll store your clothes off-site in humidity and temperature controlled facilities for up to a year.

Layer. Just pile clothes on top of yourself, and look into getting some counseling.   

HOW TO STORE YOUR EXPANDING WARDROBE

by S. Charlie Weyman

It’s embarrassing to admit, but I have more clothes than the average small-sized family, and over the years, I’ve had to come up with creative solutions for storage. Whether you’re a sane person who’s simply looking to de-clutter, or a clotheshorse looking for more space, here are ten ways to get more out of your closet. We’ll start with simple steps that can help everyone, and then descend into drastic measures for the truly depraved.

Go vertical. The key to smart storage is to maximize vertical space. Install a second rod by either attaching it to the wall or hanging it from your primary rod (there are kits for this). For a less comprehensive solution, consider hanging clothes organizers, which you can use to hold sweaters and shoes.

Read More

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A highlight of our fall shipment from Vass in Budapest : a handmade longwing boot in brown pebble grain and calf, on the P2 last.  270 degree goyser welt. Natural edges.   Exclusively for No Man Walks Alone.   😳😍 #vass  #menswear #nomanwalksalone #makers  (at No Man Walks Alone HQ)

A highlight of our fall shipment from Vass in Budapest : a handmade longwing boot in brown pebble grain and calf, on the P2 last. 270 degree goyser welt. Natural edges. Exclusively for No Man Walks Alone. 😳😍 #vass #menswear #nomanwalksalone #makers (at No Man Walks Alone HQ)

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KNOW THYSELF
by David Isle
Of the many wisdoms handed down to us by the Ancient Greeks, the one I find most relevant to clothing is gnothi seauton: know thyself. And not just in the biblical sense.Experimentation with your wardrobe teaches you not only about your personality, but also about your body. Once you start nitpicking how your clothes fit, you start noticing the your physical peculiarities that manifest themselves in wrinkles and lumps on your suit.
Among the most common defects is the “dropped” shoulder – one shoulder that is lower than the other. Once you start looking for it, you’ll wonder how you could have failed to notice it before.  In my casual observation, the dominant shoulder tends to be the lower one. You can occasionally pull a mindscrew on somebody with a low left shoulder by correctly predicting that they are left-handed just from looking at them. This asymmetry will make a jacket tend to slide down your lower shoulder. The extra material on the lower side will either bunch up somewhere (for me, right above the hip – often the hip on the side of your dropped shoulder is higher) or make the bottom of the coat lower on that side. Dropped shoulders also tend to be angled forward, which creates an imbalance between front and back to complicate the right-left skew.
Like your other abnormalities, a dropped shoulder presents you with the decision to either hide your defect or accept it. Your tailor may be able to perform some obfuscating magic to bring your shoulders into balance. There are more methods for altering jackets to accommodate a dropped shoulder than I could possibly cover here. Their multiplicity suggests that the solution is not simple, and that in the hands of your typical alterations tailor the operation will not be a success.
As always, you’re best off with a coat that fits you well in the shoulders off the rack. You may be tempted to try a jacket with more padding in the hope that the pads will even out the shoulders. But in my experience this just makes the sliding more obvious, like an off-center toupee highlights baldness. A jacket with softer construction will fall more naturally on the shoulders, revealing your true, uneven self. Know it.

KNOW THYSELF

by David Isle

Of the many wisdoms handed down to us by the Ancient Greeks, the one I find most relevant to clothing is gnothi seauton: know thyself. And not just in the biblical sense.Experimentation with your wardrobe teaches you not only about your personality, but also about your body. Once you start nitpicking how your clothes fit, you start noticing the your physical peculiarities that manifest themselves in wrinkles and lumps on your suit.

Among the most common defects is the “dropped” shoulder – one shoulder that is lower than the other. Once you start looking for it, you’ll wonder how you could have failed to notice it before.

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WHAT TO WEAR FOR: GOING OUT AT NIGHT
by David Isle
It’s been almost ten years since the “Look At My Striped Shirt!” book came out, and yet, when I go out, it still seems like three-quarters of the men around me are wearing jeans and a “button down” striped shirt. It’s the look of a bro who has been told by a woman in his life at some point that he shouldn’t go out wearing a t-shirt, and so has dutifully put on the multi-colored untucked shirt that serves as a mating call for his species.
Perhaps this sad situation was inevitable. The lamentable near-disappearance of true evening wear has left a power vacuum, into which sucky PUA-wear has stepped. No matter how many hours of red carpet coverage there are at the Oscars each year, black tie is not coming back any time soon. But you can still use some of the design principles that make black tie so elegant at night: high contrast, departures from office wear, and an evening glow.
[[MORE]]High Contrast

Valstarino bomber jacket
Big John jeans
Buttero boots
Wearing solids in dark and light tones emphasizes silhouette. The easiest path is to emulate the tuxedo by wearing a white shirt (even a t-shirt, female advice be damned), dark jacket, and dark pants. Create contrast between the jacket and the pants using texture.
Clock Out

ts(s) jacket
Orcival shirt
Rota pants
Buttero sneakers
Dudes who wear suits to work will sometimes “dress down” their navy blue business suit for a night out by just taking off the tie, or wearing the jacket as a blazer with some grey trousers. A sophisticated dresser can make these outfits look elegant, but the risk is looking like a politician trying to connect with the common people, or an undergrad trying to “look nice” for lunch with his grandmother.
The lapel facings and single button of this jacket borrow from black tie, even though the fabric texture and cropped cut mean that it should be worn casually. In any case no one would mistake it for an office suit that has lost its way. It also amuses me, but probably no one else, that the burgundy stripe of the shirt carries on a long tradition of wear white summer dinner jackets with red trimmings.

A Little Sheen

Camoshita suit
Camoshita shirt
Alfred Sargent shoes
In the daylight, shiny often looks cheap. But after the sun goes down, the lights are low enough that a shiny surface will catch just enough light to provide a twinkle in the night . Well-buffed calf shoes and satin silk accessories provide glimpses of high shine, while mohair blends, very fine cottons, and velvet give a deeper luster.

WHAT TO WEAR FOR: GOING OUT AT NIGHT

by David Isle

It’s been almost ten years since the “Look At My Striped Shirt!” book came out, and yet, when I go out, it still seems like three-quarters of the men around me are wearing jeans and a “button down” striped shirt. It’s the look of a bro who has been told by a woman in his life at some point that he shouldn’t go out wearing a t-shirt, and so has dutifully put on the multi-colored untucked shirt that serves as a mating call for his species.

Perhaps this sad situation was inevitable. The lamentable near-disappearance of true evening wear has left a power vacuum, into which sucky PUA-wear has stepped. No matter how many hours of red carpet coverage there are at the Oscars each year, black tie is not coming back any time soon. But you can still use some of the design principles that make black tie so elegant at night: high contrast, departures from office wear, and an evening glow.

Read More

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THE AESTHETICS OF ASYMMETRY 
by David Isle
Symmetry is often suggested as a cardinal virtue of aesthetics. Since symmetry is very unlikely to occur at random, its presence suggests skillful execution of a design. When something is asymmetric, it might be unclear if this is a design choice or a failed attempt at symmetry. You might, for instance, be more sure of the structural integrity of a symmetric building than an asymmetric one. Likewise, people judge symmetrical faces to be more attractive, perhaps because they signal genetic fitness.
The canon of Western art shows a reverence for symmetry, often with geometric precision.[[MORE]]  Consider Masaccio’s Holy Trinity, one of the first Renaissance paintings.

The composition has Christ a dead center, surrounded evenly by attendants and architecture. The use of perspective gives the painting depth that its predecessors lacked. But there is little energy or dynamism in the image, partly because if anyone moves, the tableau is ruined. Again, symmetry is almost never random. The artist has carefully placed his actors and his set in this position, where they must remain, like a cake too perfect to cut.
Though Western art continued to develop in many directions over the centuries that followed Masaccio, perspective and symmetrical composition maintained their hegemony until the arrival of Japanese art in the late 19th century. Japanese art does not employ perspective and therefore seems flat. But it achieves movement through careful asymmetry (a cousin of “studied nonchalance”, the original aim of sprezzatura). Consider how much would be lost if the Great Wave were in the middle of the frame rather than off to the side.

Or contrast the gardens at Versailles, a testament to man’s taming of nature and the victory of order over chaos:

with the idealization and stylization of the natural world in a Japanese garden:

Clothing follows a similar logic. In the traditional suit-and-tie dress of the Western male, symmetry dominates. This evenness projects control and competence. Only the occasional pocket square or boutonniere, or the slight skew of a four-in-hand tie knot, save the suit-and-tie from a robotic uniformity, and for this they are to be commended. More serious deviations look like silly mistakes.
Outside of the order of suit-and-tie, a little more chaos need not suggest incompetence. The more radical asymmetries, like the zipper shown above, generate energy and tension. Perhaps enough to ruffle a few pocket squares.  

THE AESTHETICS OF ASYMMETRY 

by David Isle

Symmetry is often suggested as a cardinal virtue of aesthetics. Since symmetry is very unlikely to occur at random, its presence suggests skillful execution of a design. When something is asymmetric, it might be unclear if this is a design choice or a failed attempt at symmetry. You might, for instance, be more sure of the structural integrity of a symmetric building than an asymmetric one. Likewise, people judge symmetrical faces to be more attractive, perhaps because they signal genetic fitness.

The canon of Western art shows a reverence for symmetry, often with geometric precision.

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HOW TO COOL DOWN IN SUMMERTIME
By S. Charlie Weyman
Summer is a great time for many things. We get music festivals in the park, reasons to go to the beach, and better afternoons spent on the porch. At the same time, it can be hard to enjoy anything when the weather is hot and humid. Aside from making you uncomfortable, those climbing temperatures can make you sweaty, which – much like wearing matching ties and pocket square sets, or haggling with locals abroad – will always make you look bad.
So, how to deal with the heat?
Fabrics: Your intuition might be to stick to cottons and linens over wool, but in reality, the fibers in a fabric are less important than the fabric’s weave and weight. Look for things that feel light and loosely woven. You can hold a fabric up to the light, for example, to see if it’s porous. The more breathable the fabric, the cooler you’ll feel.

Stuffing: Tailored jackets aren’t made like shirts – they have a structure inside to give them shape. The more structure, the more stuffing; the more stuffing, the hotter you’ll feel. Look instead for things that are lightly padded and constructed. Generally speaking, you’ll find these most easily from Italian brands.
Lining: Similarly, you can get jackets with minimal lining, which will make your clothes more breathable. If your jacket is already fully lined, know that your tailor can un-line it for about $50. You typically only want to do this to the back, but be careful with any jacket that feels very light. In those cases, a lining can actually help your jacket drape better.
Baring ankles: This might sound like an excuse to look trendy, but forgoing socks can be an effective way to cool down. You ankles have a lot of veins near the surface of the skin, so it’s an effective place to dissipate heat. To forgo socks, put a little Gold Bond powder inside your shoes, so that your feet stay dry and cool. You can also use terry cloth insoles or no-show socks to prevent sweat from soaking into your footwear.
Cooling your arms: You have a lot of veins running close to the surface of your wrists and inner elbow, so try cooling down by running your wrists under cold water or putting a cold soda can in the crook of your arm. This can reduce your body temperature for up to an hour.  

HOW TO COOL DOWN IN SUMMERTIME

By S. Charlie Weyman

Summer is a great time for many things. We get music festivals in the park, reasons to go to the beach, and better afternoons spent on the porch. At the same time, it can be hard to enjoy anything when the weather is hot and humid. Aside from making you uncomfortable, those climbing temperatures can make you sweaty, which – much like wearing matching ties and pocket square sets, or haggling with locals abroad – will always make you look bad.

So, how to deal with the heat?

Fabrics: Your intuition might be to stick to cottons and linens over wool, but in reality, the fibers in a fabric are less important than the fabric’s weave and weight. Look for things that feel light and loosely woven. You can hold a fabric up to the light, for example, to see if it’s porous. The more breathable the fabric, the cooler you’ll feel.

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guaizine:

GUAIzine at #PITTIUOMO86 by @pitti_immagine 
#PHOTO by male® #June ‘14
#MENSWEAR #MENSFASHION #MENSTYLE

Always cool to stumble onto candid shots on the tumblrosphere… Greg wearing a Sartoria Formosa bespoke sport coat, G. Inglese linen shirt and Lunettes Kollektion sunglasses at Pitti Uomo in June

guaizine:

GUAIzine at #PITTIUOMO86 by @pitti_immagine 

#PHOTO by male® #June ‘14

#MENSWEAR #MENSFASHION #MENSTYLE

Always cool to stumble onto candid shots on the tumblrosphere…

Greg wearing a Sartoria Formosa bespoke sport coat, G. Inglese linen shirt and Lunettes Kollektion sunglasses at Pitti Uomo in June

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VANITY FAIR CARICATURES: AN INTRODUCTION
by Alan Cornett
Statesmen and scientists, ministers and musicians, authors and artists, there was hardly a human pursuit without a representative in the caricatures of the late Victorian political and society magazine Vanity Fair. From its founding by Thomas Gibson Bowles in January 1869 until its demise at the dawn of the Great War, Vanity Fair’s forty-five year run produced more than two thousand lithographic illustrations.
Although dozens of artists produced caricatures for Vanity Fair, two stand above the rest. The magazine’s first artist was Italian Carlo Pellegrini, who signed his work with the nom de crayon “Ape.” Notoriously volatile, and something of a bohemian, Pellegrini set the standard and idiom for the Vanity Fair caricatures. He said that was caricature “a comic portrait yet with as much of a man’s disposition as you can get into it.” Cartoonist David Low agreed, writing that Pellegrini’s illustrations were “probably more like the person they depict than were the persons themselves.”
But no artist is more closely identified with Vanity Fair than Pellegrini’s successor, and sometimes rival, Leslie Ward. Single handedly producing over thirteen hundred of the magazine’s portraits, Ward’s nom de crayon “Spy” became synonymous with Vanity Fair caricatures, which are commonly known as “Spy prints.”
The width and breadth of Victorian society provided the subjects for Vanity Fair. Many of its “Men of the Day” were individuals with no enduring fame. But the still-famous were well represented: Benjamin Disraeli, a young Winston Churchill, white-suited Mark Twain, Auguste Rodin, Charles Darwin, G.K. Chesterton, James McNeill Whistler, and Frank Liszt scratch the surface of the who’s who. 
Vanity Fair is often known for its iconic red robed judges and jockeys. But caricatures of sportsmen are also highly sought after, particularly cricket prints of men like William Gilbert Grace. The sartorialist will note that these sportsmen often wear the antecedents of attire codified in the illustrations of classic clothing artists J.C. Leyendecker and Laurence Fellows. Sportcoats, blazers, cuffed white flannels, spectator shoes, and polo coats abound.
Rarer Vanity Fair caricatures can run into the hundreds and even thousands of dollars. However, there is also a plentiful supply of relatively inexpensive, yet attractive, images. One can purchase an authentic (beware of reprints) Vanity Fair lithograph for as little as ten dollars. There is really no barrier to entering the market other than the good taste to do so.

VANITY FAIR CARICATURES: AN INTRODUCTION

by Alan Cornett

Statesmen and scientists, ministers and musicians, authors and artists, there was hardly a human pursuit without a representative in the caricatures of the late Victorian political and society magazine Vanity Fair. From its founding by Thomas Gibson Bowles in January 1869 until its demise at the dawn of the Great War, Vanity Fair’s forty-five year run produced more than two thousand lithographic illustrations.

Although dozens of artists produced caricatures for Vanity Fair, two stand above the rest.

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Our customers are good designers!  Here’s beautiful pair of custom-ordered Vass derbies in brown “museum” calf.  They came out pretty well, didn’t they? #makers #vass  (at www.nomanwalksalone.com)

Our customers are good designers! Here’s beautiful pair of custom-ordered Vass derbies in brown “museum” calf. They came out pretty well, didn’t they? #makers #vass (at www.nomanwalksalone.com)

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