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HOW TO COOL DOWN IN SUMMERTIME
By S. Charlie Weyman
Summer is a great time for many things. We get music festivals in the park, reasons to go to the beach, and better afternoons spent on the porch. At the same time, it can be hard to enjoy anything when the weather is hot and humid. Aside from making you uncomfortable, those climbing temperatures can make you sweaty, which – much like wearing matching ties and pocket square sets, or haggling with locals abroad – will always make you look bad.
So, how to deal with the heat?
Fabrics: Your intuition might be to stick to cottons and linens over wool, but in reality, the fibers in a fabric are less important than the fabric’s weave and weight. Look for things that feel light and loosely woven. You can hold a fabric up to the light, for example, to see if it’s porous. The more breathable the fabric, the cooler you’ll feel.

Stuffing: Tailored jackets aren’t made like shirts – they have a structure inside to give them shape. The more structure, the more stuffing; the more stuffing, the hotter you’ll feel. Look instead for things that are lightly padded and constructed. Generally speaking, you’ll find these most easily from Italian brands.
Lining: Similarly, you can get jackets with minimal lining, which will make your clothes more breathable. If your jacket is already fully lined, know that your tailor can un-line it for about $50. You typically only want to do this to the back, but be careful with any jacket that feels very light. In those cases, a lining can actually help your jacket drape better.
Baring ankles: This might sound like an excuse to look trendy, but forgoing socks can be an effective way to cool down. You ankles have a lot of veins near the surface of the skin, so it’s an effective place to dissipate heat. To forgo socks, put a little Gold Bond powder inside your shoes, so that your feet stay dry and cool. You can also use terry cloth insoles or no-show socks to prevent sweat from soaking into your footwear.
Cooling your arms: You have a lot of veins running close to the surface of your wrists and inner elbow, so try cooling down by running your wrists under cold water or putting a cold soda can in the crook of your arm. This can reduce your body temperature for up to an hour.  

HOW TO COOL DOWN IN SUMMERTIME

By S. Charlie Weyman

Summer is a great time for many things. We get music festivals in the park, reasons to go to the beach, and better afternoons spent on the porch. At the same time, it can be hard to enjoy anything when the weather is hot and humid. Aside from making you uncomfortable, those climbing temperatures can make you sweaty, which – much like wearing matching ties and pocket square sets, or haggling with locals abroad – will always make you look bad.

So, how to deal with the heat?

Fabrics: Your intuition might be to stick to cottons and linens over wool, but in reality, the fibers in a fabric are less important than the fabric’s weave and weight. Look for things that feel light and loosely woven. You can hold a fabric up to the light, for example, to see if it’s porous. The more breathable the fabric, the cooler you’ll feel.

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guaizine:

GUAIzine at #PITTIUOMO86 by @pitti_immagine 
#PHOTO by male® #June ‘14
#MENSWEAR #MENSFASHION #MENSTYLE

Always cool to stumble onto candid shots on the tumblrosphere… Greg wearing a Sartoria Formosa bespoke sport coat, G. Inglese linen shirt and Lunettes Kollektion sunglasses at Pitti Uomo in June

guaizine:

GUAIzine at #PITTIUOMO86 by @pitti_immagine 

#PHOTO by male® #June ‘14

#MENSWEAR #MENSFASHION #MENSTYLE

Always cool to stumble onto candid shots on the tumblrosphere…

Greg wearing a Sartoria Formosa bespoke sport coat, G. Inglese linen shirt and Lunettes Kollektion sunglasses at Pitti Uomo in June

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VANITY FAIR CARICATURES: AN INTRODUCTION
by Alan Cornett
Statesmen and scientists, ministers and musicians, authors and artists, there was hardly a human pursuit without a representative in the caricatures of the late Victorian political and society magazine Vanity Fair. From its founding by Thomas Gibson Bowles in January 1869 until its demise at the dawn of the Great War, Vanity Fair’s forty-five year run produced more than two thousand lithographic illustrations.
Although dozens of artists produced caricatures for Vanity Fair, two stand above the rest. The magazine’s first artist was Italian Carlo Pellegrini, who signed his work with the nom de crayon “Ape.” Notoriously volatile, and something of a bohemian, Pellegrini set the standard and idiom for the Vanity Fair caricatures. He said that was caricature “a comic portrait yet with as much of a man’s disposition as you can get into it.” Cartoonist David Low agreed, writing that Pellegrini’s illustrations were “probably more like the person they depict than were the persons themselves.”
But no artist is more closely identified with Vanity Fair than Pellegrini’s successor, and sometimes rival, Leslie Ward. Single handedly producing over thirteen hundred of the magazine’s portraits, Ward’s nom de crayon “Spy” became synonymous with Vanity Fair caricatures, which are commonly known as “Spy prints.”
The width and breadth of Victorian society provided the subjects for Vanity Fair. Many of its “Men of the Day” were individuals with no enduring fame. But the still-famous were well represented: Benjamin Disraeli, a young Winston Churchill, white-suited Mark Twain, Auguste Rodin, Charles Darwin, G.K. Chesterton, James McNeill Whistler, and Frank Liszt scratch the surface of the who’s who. 
Vanity Fair is often known for its iconic red robed judges and jockeys. But caricatures of sportsmen are also highly sought after, particularly cricket prints of men like William Gilbert Grace. The sartorialist will note that these sportsmen often wear the antecedents of attire codified in the illustrations of classic clothing artists J.C. Leyendecker and Laurence Fellows. Sportcoats, blazers, cuffed white flannels, spectator shoes, and polo coats abound.
Rarer Vanity Fair caricatures can run into the hundreds and even thousands of dollars. However, there is also a plentiful supply of relatively inexpensive, yet attractive, images. One can purchase an authentic (beware of reprints) Vanity Fair lithograph for as little as ten dollars. There is really no barrier to entering the market other than the good taste to do so.

VANITY FAIR CARICATURES: AN INTRODUCTION

by Alan Cornett

Statesmen and scientists, ministers and musicians, authors and artists, there was hardly a human pursuit without a representative in the caricatures of the late Victorian political and society magazine Vanity Fair. From its founding by Thomas Gibson Bowles in January 1869 until its demise at the dawn of the Great War, Vanity Fair’s forty-five year run produced more than two thousand lithographic illustrations.

Although dozens of artists produced caricatures for Vanity Fair, two stand above the rest.

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Our customers are good designers!  Here’s beautiful pair of custom-ordered Vass derbies in brown “museum” calf.  They came out pretty well, didn’t they? #makers #vass  (at www.nomanwalksalone.com)

Our customers are good designers! Here’s beautiful pair of custom-ordered Vass derbies in brown “museum” calf. They came out pretty well, didn’t they? #makers #vass (at www.nomanwalksalone.com)

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DON’T FORGET SNEAKERS
by S. Charlie Weyman
A good wardrobe is a well-rounded wardrobe. Just as great-looking coat and tie can enhance a night on the town, a pair of slim jeans and a casual jacket give you another reason to enjoy a day at the park. Your shoe wardrobe should cover just as much ground. Oxfords with suits, derbys with sport coats, loafers and chukkas with classic weekend wear, and sneakers with anything truly casual.
Sneakers have gotten a bad rap in some circles. The word brings to mind those ratty running shoes people wear for everyday walking. The last decade, however, has reinvented the sneaker. Gone are the big swooshes and tri-stripes of sport shoes, and the bright colors of fashionable Japanese sneakers in the ‘90s. Instead, the new sneakers are minimalist and uncomplicated, following the design philosophy of the architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, “less is more.”

The advantage of such simple designs is that they’re exceptionally versatile. Many take after classic styles in the 20th century – Adidas’ Stan Smiths, mostly, although some are modeled after iconic Nike shoes as well. Stripped of the logos, the sneakers become less sporty and easier to wear with a range of casual clothes. Whereas the original models were made of either canvas or thin, low-grade leather, the updated versions are made of nicer leather, resulting in a sneaker that ages better with time.
White or off-white is the most versatile color, and and is most faithful to those original, clean 20th-century designs. Earthier colors like browns and olives show off the higher quality leather more, and perhaps recast the sneaker more as an ultra-casual version of the brown derbies and brogues you would wear with a sportcoat. In these colors, the well-made sneaker shows its alliance with the renewed appreciation of Goodyear-welted dressed shoes. As with dress shoes, you can tell a well-made sneaker by its stitched-on sole, and its leather that is thick and supple rather than thin and dry.
You can pair minimalist sneakers with almost anything – jeans and a leather jacket; brushed cotton chinos and a shawl collared cardigan; and, if the silhouette of your shoes is slim enough, even a casual suit. Not in professional environments, of course, but if the event is informal, sneakers can be a nice way to subvert the inherent dressiness of a tailored jacket. As a cornerstone of casual dress, a pair of sneakers is as essential to a well-rounded wardrobe as Goodyear-welted oxfords.  

DON’T FORGET SNEAKERS

by S. Charlie Weyman

A good wardrobe is a well-rounded wardrobe. Just as great-looking coat and tie can enhance a night on the town, a pair of slim jeans and a casual jacket give you another reason to enjoy a day at the park. Your shoe wardrobe should cover just as much ground. Oxfords with suits, derbys with sport coats, loafers and chukkas with classic weekend wear, and sneakers with anything truly casual.

Sneakers have gotten a bad rap in some circles. The word brings to mind those ratty running shoes people wear for everyday walking. The last decade, however, has reinvented the sneaker. Gone are the big swooshes and tri-stripes of sport shoes, and the bright colors of fashionable Japanese sneakers in the ‘90s. Instead, the new sneakers are minimalist and uncomplicated, following the design philosophy of the architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, “less is more.”

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Source: Martin Rose/Getty Images South America; Michael Steele/Getty Images South America; Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images South America

SIDELINE STYLE

by William Phips

This post really should be about WAGs or, at the very least, about Neymar’s footwork or how Messi is - statistically - a futbol playing robot designed to show us just how beautiful the beautiful game can be.

But this isn’t that type of blog.

This is about what to wear. I have it on good authority that most national team coaches are, in fact, avid followers of No Man Walks Alone (Maradona, if you’re reading this, you’re absolutely right. One Hublot isn’t enough for la mano de dios.)  But this lesson, a Goldilocks tale of business casual played out on the sidelines by coaches of Group G, applies to anyone.

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SUMMERTIME AND THE LINEN’S EASY

by William Phips

To appreciate linen you need to see it worn in its natural environment. For years I knew it as something a senior manager would wear to work on a Friday in the summer to announce that he’d be leaving at three to spend the weekend in the Hamptons. The fabric always seemed out of place in an office tower in New York City – too rumpled for a buttoned-up office and impractically light for a dirty metropolis. But once you’ve reached your weekend destination and sit down to enjoy a cold drink, linen is just the thing.

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PARKER’S POSES

by David Isle

I know few dressers with as wide an aesthetic range as the man you see above. He posts on Styleforum under the name Parker, and is also the art director for the No Man Walks Alone website. In this interview we discuss the origins of his expansive stylistic interests, and the impetus for his continuing experimentation.

You’ve mastered a wide range of styles - what did you start with, and what was your path from there? Do you think your starting point affected how you viewed other styles of clothing from there on out?

I’ve always had fairly diverse interests. I first got into clothes through the Mod and surf scenes in Southern California. As a college student I did a lot of thrift shopping in LA, mostly looking for 60s vintage surf and Ivy League styles. I haven’t really taken a linear path to clothes, but just followed my interests in music, fashion and design. Recently I’ve been into more contemporary designer clothes but my view of what looks cool to me was definitely established in my early years. 

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GENERATIONAL STYLE 

by Alan Cornett

One of the ways to step outside the rushing whirlwind of fashion is to have a solid connection with our past and our future. We like to imagine we are resistant to the culture of disposable fashion, but it’s hard not to be pulled by the gravity of the moment. Thinking about style across generations can push us beyond the season, and even beyond our own lifetime.

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DE-CODED DRESS

by Jasper L

You’ve cultivated your business wardrobe, you’ve spent hours and hours matching fabrics and taking measurements and reading up on tailoring traditions, and at last - at last! - you’ve nailed it. You cut a fine figure at the office, you wear a suit like a second skin, your ties are complementary and oft-complimented. But Friday afternoon leaves you at a loss, and by the time it’s the season for barbecues and weekend brunches (or wintry evenings on the town), you’ve backed yourself into a corner, unsure what to do when not dressing for business. There is a vast world that lies between hard science of business attire and the clockwork slump of chino shorts, old college tees and flip-flops. It’s less prescriptive than the Church of the Suit and Tie, less focused on rules and regulations, but equally enthralling, and equally full of beauty and expression.

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MORE THAN YOU PROBABLY WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT LINEN
by William Phips
Archaeological records suggest that the ancients were weaving linen before they moved out of caves. But it has always been a laborious task. The use of linen way back when is a testament to the patience of our ancestors.
This is the short version of the long story of where linen comes from or, perhaps more to the point, why it’s more expensive than similar quality cotton.       
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Flax (the plan from which linen is made) grows best in cool climates, which is why you’ve heard of Irish linen but not so much Irish beach weather. The fibers that are eventually transformed into linen yarns and cloth come from the stem of the plant. In order to salvage fibers that are as long as possible, the plants are ideally pulled up by their roots, or at least cut very close to the ground when it’s time to harvest. 
After harvesting, the seeds are removed via rippling, essentially running the stalks through large metal combs. Once cotton has had its seeds removed, it’s just about ready to be spun into yarns and then woven. With linen, however, there are another three steps, each more amusingly named than the last, before it can be spun.
Retting   The fibers that will ultimately be woven must be loosened from the stalk. This is done by allowing bacteria to decompose the pectin (a sort of natural glue that sometimes used as a gelling agent in jams and jellies) bonds that binds the useful fibers to the woody center of the stalk and to each other. This can be done entirely naturally by letting the cut stalks lie in the field for a few weeks or the process can be sped up by keeping them in a climate-controlled tank. Using a chemical bath speeds the process up further but risks damaging the fibers themselves.
Scutching   The retted stalks are passed through metal rollers that crush the woody center while leaving the flexible, spin-able fibers relatively undisturbed. 
Hecking   Finally, the scutched fibers are combed to remove the shorter one and leave only the longest fibers which can then be spun and woven.
Each step in this process is a corner that can be cut on the road to profit.  There aren’t too many makers that manage to resist that temptation. But those that do produce the top quality linen that mankind has prized for millennia.

G. Inglese linen shirt

Sartoria Formosa linen suit


Stephan Schneider washed linen scarf

Begg cotton and linen scarf

MORE THAN YOU PROBABLY WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT LINEN

by William Phips

Archaeological records suggest that the ancients were weaving linen before they moved out of caves. But it has always been a laborious task. The use of linen way back when is a testament to the patience of our ancestors.

This is the short version of the long story of where linen comes from or, perhaps more to the point, why it’s more expensive than similar quality cotton.       

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Mackintosh raincoats, made by hand

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DEVELOPING YOUR EYE
by David Isle
I once read of an interaction between an antiques collector and the writer Bruce Chatwin, who as a young man worked in the antiques department of Sotheby’s. The collector had seen Chatwin pull out of a pile of worthless rubbish the one article that had any character and value. “I see that you have The Eye,” began the collector. “I too have The Eye.”
Among art dealers, The Eye is that unteachable and irrevocable power to discern art from trash, real from fake, inspired from derivative. It is the capacity to appreciate something that you have not already been taught that you must appreciate. The legend of The Eye would have it that this talent cannot be learned. But I believe that attention and exposure to a wide variety of interesting objects is what sharpens The Eye.
Men who enjoy looking at and wearing tailored clothing tend not to develop their aesthetic sense in this way. There is instead a matryoshka of “rules”, which extend to the minutest of details. There is some sense to this. The suit is a garment with a history and a social meaning. There is a “right” and “wrong” way for a suit to fit – if not in an absolute aesthetic sense, at least in meeting society’s expectations of a suit-wearer, which is often important on occasions which require wearing a suit. The easiest way to fulfill this duty is by going through a checklist – are the sleeves the right length, is there an “X” indicating tightness at the buttoning point, etc..
And yet most of the really great dressers I know don’t worry so much about these things, and tend to dismiss complaints such as “your sleeve is a 1/4” too short”. It’s not that they don’t care about these details. It’s that they have developed the ability to look at an outfit holistically, rather than in parts. They have The Eye.
Hardy Amies once said, “if it looks right, it is right.” Of course the question is if it looks right to whom. Eventually, the answer should be to you, the wearer. At first most people are not confident in deciding what they thing looks right. Relying on rules at this stage can be a useful crutch, but try not to become dependent on them. Wander wherever your eye takes you. Then when you look back in the mirror, it’ll be right.

DEVELOPING YOUR EYE

by David Isle

I once read of an interaction between an antiques collector and the writer Bruce Chatwin, who as a young man worked in the antiques department of Sotheby’s. The collector had seen Chatwin pull out of a pile of worthless rubbish the one article that had any character and value. “I see that you have The Eye,” began the collector. “I too have The Eye.”

Among art dealers, The Eye is that unteachable and irrevocable power to discern art from trash, real from fake, inspired from derivative. It is the capacity to appreciate something that you have not already been taught that you must appreciate. The legend of The Eye would have it that this talent cannot be learned. But I believe that attention and exposure to a wide variety of interesting objects is what sharpens The Eye.

Men who enjoy looking at and wearing tailored clothing tend not to develop their aesthetic sense in this way.

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Looking great! The shoulder line is beautiful.

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Arrivederci Firenze !    Thanks again for being such a great host.  Until next time… 🇮🇹 (at Piazza del Duomo)

Arrivederci Firenze ! Thanks again for being such a great host. Until next time… 🇮🇹 (at Piazza del Duomo)

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