EOTOTO
by Pete Anderson
The difference between a tourist and a traveler is described well by a character in Paul Bowles’ The Sheltering Sky: “Whereas the tourist generally hurries back home at the end of a few weeks or months, the traveler, belonging no more to one place than to the next, moves slowly, over periods of years, from one part of the earth to another.” Likewise, the tourist may buy a souvenir at the airport or roadside gift shop and put it on a bookshelf, dusting it off for a show and tell performed for dinner guests, but a traveler’s only keepsake is his own enviably windblown character. Often at ease; never at home. Bowles’s novels are not light, inspirational travelogues written for Oprah’s Book Club celebrating yuppy-ism in exotic locations (eat! pray! etc.); they’re thick with dark implication and the intoxicating, sometimes sinister possibilities of choosing a life with neither God nor country.
A Bowlesian traveler might appreciate the clothes of EOTOTO, a creation of a mysterious pair of artist/designers known as the Wonder Worker Guerilla Band (they also collaborate on art projects and a sister brand, Sasquatchfabrix).  EOTOTO’s enigmatic collections of richly detailed clothing are novel applications for folk-derived textiles. Custom fabrics with roots that branch through European, Asian, American, and African cultures are repurposed into modern, comfortable garment shapes. This is clothing for nights spread out against the sky, and languorous days in unfamiliar cities where no one knows who you are, and where you’re from is up to you. This fall EOTOTO journeys through Central Asia, but borrows broadly from other traditions, with ikat fabric trims, accessories from the American southwest (“Eototo” itself refers to a deity of the Hopi people), plus an appearance from the brand’s now signature skull motif. Spring 2014 is an invitation to Pacific islands, with Hawaiian-influenced fabrics and cuts and abundant aloha patterns evocative of the tropics.
Season by season, EOTOTO’s  road-worn fabrics and fables gather in the kind of narrative yarn one stranger spin for another in a Zagat-unrated pub over an unfamiliar card game and a shared bottle of local liquor.

EOTOTO

by Pete Anderson

The difference between a tourist and a traveler is described well by a character in Paul Bowles’ The Sheltering Sky: “Whereas the tourist generally hurries back home at the end of a few weeks or months, the traveler, belonging no more to one place than to the next, moves slowly, over periods of years, from one part of the earth to another.” Likewise, the tourist may buy a souvenir at the airport or roadside gift shop and put it on a bookshelf, dusting it off for a show and tell performed for dinner guests, but a traveler’s only keepsake is his own enviably windblown character. Often at ease; never at home. Bowles’s novels are not light, inspirational travelogues written for Oprah’s Book Club celebrating yuppy-ism in exotic locations (eat! pray! etc.); they’re thick with dark implication and the intoxicating, sometimes sinister possibilities of choosing a life with neither God nor country.

A Bowlesian traveler might appreciate the clothes of EOTOTO, a creation of a mysterious pair of artist/designers known as the Wonder Worker Guerilla Band (they also collaborate on art projects and a sister brand, Sasquatchfabrix). EOTOTO’s enigmatic collections of richly detailed clothing are novel applications for folk-derived textiles. Custom fabrics with roots that branch through European, Asian, American, and African cultures are repurposed into modern, comfortable garment shapes. This is clothing for nights spread out against the sky, and languorous days in unfamiliar cities where no one knows who you are, and where you’re from is up to you. This fall EOTOTO journeys through Central Asia, but borrows broadly from other traditions, with ikat fabric trims, accessories from the American southwest (“Eototo” itself refers to a deity of the Hopi people), plus an appearance from the brand’s now signature skull motif. Spring 2014 is an invitation to Pacific islands, with Hawaiian-influenced fabrics and cuts and abundant aloha patterns evocative of the tropics.

Season by season, EOTOTO’s  road-worn fabrics and fables gather in the kind of narrative yarn one stranger spin for another in a Zagat-unrated pub over an unfamiliar card game and a shared bottle of local liquor.

Comments powered by Disqus
  1. bearseason reblogged this from nomanwalksalone
  2. lostintheworldofmusic reblogged this from nomanwalksalone
  3. fearher reblogged this from nomanwalksalone
  4. visualcharisma reblogged this from nomanwalksalone
  5. angulartaste reblogged this from nomanwalksalone
  6. jayce030 reblogged this from breathnaigh
  7. ogyawn-deactivated20131117 reblogged this from breathnaigh
  8. breathnaigh reblogged this from nomanwalksalone and added:
    I did a little writing for new men’s store No Man Walks Alone. Eototo is a rad brand I’d like to see more of in US...
  9. theprimpingpajock reblogged this from nomanwalksalone
  10. nomanwalksalone posted this